Saturday, 28 July 2012

GI DIET - FALAFEL



Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

A Middle Eastern speciality, this falafel is a healthier version suitable for a GI diet.  
Serves 6

Ingredients
250 g / 9 oz dried chickpeas (soaked overnight)
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 garlic clove
1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon coriander
2 tablespoons fresh chopped parsley
2 tablespoons fresh chopped coriander
2 tablespoons fresh chopped mint
2 tablespoons vegetable oil

Method
Soak the chickpeas in water overnight and drain.  Finely chop the onion and garlic clove.  
Blend all the ingredients together in a food blender to form a dough like mixture.
Shape into 24 patties and fry until golden brown on both sides.

Serve with pitta bread, salad and pickled chillies.

Tuesday, 24 July 2012

GI DIET - PORRIDGE WITH BERRIES


Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

There is no better way to start the day than with a hot bowl of porridge. This is a really low GI breakfast, especially compared to breakfast cereals, and will keep you satisfied until lunch.
Serves 6

Ingredients

200g (7oz) porridge oats
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Low fat natural yogurt
350g (12oz) berries (strawberries, blackberries, raspberries, blueberries)
2 pints / 1.2 litres semi-skimmed milk

Boil the milk gently in a large saucepan.  When it comes to the boil slowly pour in the oats and stir continuously.  Add the cinnamon.

Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 minutes until the porridge has reached the required consistency.  Serve into bowls adding a spoonful of yogurt and sprinkle with the berries.



For related articles click onto:
GI Diet - Carrot and pineapple cake
GI Diet - Falafal
GI Diet - Fruit and vegetables
GI Diet - Dairy foods
GI Diet - Food and Diet
GI Diet - Low GI Foods
GI Diet - Porridge with berries
GI Diet - Vegetable pizza
GI Diet - Smoked salmon and cottage cheese sandwich

Saturday, 21 July 2012

CARING FOR THE CORAL REEFS


Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

Coral reefs form living sea beds that support rich ecosystems.  they are of immense value to wildlife and people, but come under pressure from many threats - mostly initiated by man.


The worldwide pressure on coral reefs demands effective conservation.  Some elements of reef conservation are fairly straightforward to put into place, while others need a high degree of international cooperation and legislation.

Many countries, recognising the importance of reefs, have made them nature reserves.  There are around 300 protected reef areas in over 60 countries.  The good management of reefs is a key factor in their conservation.  If fishing and recreation are carefully controlled and some areas kept free of disturbance as sanctuary areas the reef can be used and enjoyed in a way which does no harm.


The problems of siltation, pollution and global warming are not solved by making reefs nature reserves.  They need international action and cooperation on controlling our harmful activities.
Individuals can help reefs, especially by refusing to buy souvenirs made from reef wildlife.  Marine aquarium fish should not be taken from the reefs but bought captive breed.

Direct threats to the reef
Coral is mined for the construction industry in many parts of the world.  Mining can ruin the structure of the reef, with further unwelcome side effects.  In Sri Lanka immense damage has occurred where coral has been mined for its limestone.  With the protective reefs gone, the sea has washed away beaches and roads.

Coastal building work itself can threaten coral reefs.  Clearance, infilling and construction work can cloud the water, alter water circulation patterns and physically damage the reef structure.


Overfishing has had a damaging effect on many reefs, depleting stocks of valuable food species such as fish and lobsters.  fishing can cause damage when traps are laid directly on the coral, when reefs are beaten to scare fish into nets or when explosives are used to stun fish.

Corals are taken to be sold as souvenirs, as are shells.  reef fish, many of which are very attractive, are taken for the marine aquarium trade. Litter, damage from shipping, collection of corals and trampling are all problems caused by excessive recreational use of reefs. 

Damage from a distance
Siltation can affect the delicate coral reef. when silt is washed off the land into the sea and carried to a coral reef it can cloud the water, reducing the light that reaches the plant life of the reef; even affecting the algae that live inside the coral reef itself.


Pollution can pose a serious threat. Pesticides and industrial waste can poison reef animals and plants.  Sewage effluent and fertiliser run off from agricultural land can cause blooms (excessive growths) of algae.  Algal blooms, fed by plant nutrients in the pollution, are often accompanied by depletion of the dissolved oxygen that is vital for reef wildlife.
On the Caribbean island of Aruba, for example, a reef next to an oil refinery has suffered pollution for many years and is gradually being destroyed.

Siltation and pollution can stress corals and other reef building species such as hard red algae and make a reef more vulnerable to disease, storm damage and reef boring creatures such as sea urchins.  Corals suffering from serious oil pollution have been shown to fail to grow back again.


For related articles click onto:
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Can starfish grow back their arms?
Caring for the coral reefs
Causes of acid rain

Coral reefs and the greenhouse effect
Conserving fossil fuels
Energy saving light bulbs
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy

How many seas are there in the world?
Keystone species
Sea animals: Sea Anemones
Seahorse facts
Star Starfish
The seahorse
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is a sea anemone?
What is a starfish?
What is a sea sponge?
What is a loofah?
What is a sea cucumber?
What is a cuttlefish?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the Gulf Stream?

Wednesday, 18 July 2012

CORAL REEFS AND THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT


Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

Coral reefs form living sea beds that support rich ecosystems.  They are of immense value to wildlife and people, but come under pressure from many threats - mostly initiated by man.


They grow in the warm seas of the world and consist mainly of the skeletal remains of coral polyps; tiny creatures that amass in countless numbers to form a very slow growing colony.

Coral reefs are extremely rich habitats.  It has been estimated that the worlds reefs may support as many as half a million types of animal in all, including a third of fish fish species.

Reefs are also very important to people.  They can yield up to 20 tonnes of fish per square metre per year.  They protect coasts from storms and erosion.  They can also provide considerable revenue from recreation (the Great Barrier reef in Australia earns many millions per year).

Coral reefs need clear, warm, shallow waters with a  narrow temperature range, little sedimentation and good water circulation.  Disruption of these conditions can damage the reef ecosystem. 
Given time reefs can often recover from damage, even from the severe effects of a hurricane.  But human interference, from mining to pollution, can sometimes be too intense and damaging for the slow growing reefs and their rich wildlife to survive. 

There have been many reports of coral reef bleaching, where reefs lose their glorious colours and turn a ghostly white.  In September 1987 divers at a reef off Puerto Rico found themselves in a yellow-brown cloud rather than the usual crystal clear water.  

They were experiencing the breakdown of the relationship between coral polyps and the algae that live inside them.  The algae are believed to promote the polyps growth and help them produce the limestone skeletons that build the reef.  The divers were swimming through a cloud of algae released into the water as this vital relationship broke down, leading to bleaching.


Researchers believe raised sea temperatures are the principal cause of the breakdown.  Although temperatures can rise and fall naturally, the frequency and severity of bleachings are thought to be due to the effect of global warming.

Unless global warming is bought under control coral reefs could continue to suffer.  The more frequent and severe the bleachings are, the more difficult it will be for the worlds coral reefs to survive them.

For related articles click onto:
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Can starfish grow back their arms?
Caring for the coral reefs
Causes of acid rain

Coral reefs and the greenhouse effect
Conserving fossil fuels
Energy saving light bulbs
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy

How many seas are there in the world?
Keystone species
Sea animals: Sea Anemones
Seahorse facts
Star Starfish
The seahorse
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is a sea anemone?
What is a starfish?
What is a sea sponge?
What is a loofah?
What is a sea cucumber?
What is a cuttlefish?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the Gulf Stream?

Horticulture

Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop


Aphids
Artichokes
Bella donna
Christmas trees
Can you keep bees in your garden?
Differences between vegetables and fruit
Drainage
Do worms sleep?
Edible fungi
Feeding plants
Garden sheds
Grass maintenance - laying turf
Grass maintenance - sowing a lawn from seed
Great Dixter

Growing Christmas trees
Green manure: Broad beans

Growing Garlic in Containers
Growing herbs
Growing herbs in pots
Growing herbs on a windowsill
Growing rhubarb
Growing potatoes
Growing tomatoes
Growing tomatoes from seed
Harvesting potatoes

Herbaceous borders
History of the lawn
How big is a giant earthworm?
How do I attract bees into my garden?
How do you know when tomatoes are ripe?
How to grow broccoli from seed
How to grow cauliflower from seed
How to grow garlic
How to grow lavender
How to keep your cut Christmas tree
How do seedless fruits propagate
How to build a cold frame
How to Grow Agave from Seed
How to grow artichokes from rooted cuttings
How to grow artichokes from seed
How to Grow Asparagus from Seed
How to grow basil
How to grow beetroot from seed
How to grow butternut squash
How to grow cabbage from seed
How to grow carrots from seed
How to grow cress
How to grow coriander
How to grow cucumbers from seed
How to grow geraniums from seed
How to grow Dahlias
How to grow french beans from seed
How to grow giant cabbage from seed
How to grow giant celery from seed
How to grow giant leeks from seed
How to grow giant onions from seed
How to grow giant parsnips from seed
How to grow giant sunflowers
How to grow garlic
How to grow geraniums
How to Grow Ginger
How to grow kiwi
How to grow lavender
How to grow leeks from seed
How to grow lettuce from seed
How to grow mint
How to grow mistletoe from seed
How to grow mushrooms
How to grow onions from onion sets
How to grow onions from seed
How to grow parsley
How to grow parsley
How to grow Peppadew peppers from seed
How to plant Dahlia tubers
How to grow peas
How to Grow Pumpkins from Seed
How to grow rosemary
How to grow runner beans from seed
How to grow runner beans from seed
How to grow orchids
How to grow seeds indoors
How to grow squash
How to grow strawberries from seed
How to grow sunflowers from seed
How to grow sweet peppers
How to grow sweet potatoes
How to grow thyme
How to grow tomatoes from seed
How to make compost
How to keep your Christmas tree
How to overwinter geraniums
How to propagate using division
How to propagate by grafting
How to propagate from seed
Indoor cacti garden
Lawn care
Lawn grasses
Laying concrete
Majorelle gardens
Manuring
Non-grass lawn
Nymans Gardens: History
Nymans Gardens
Nymans: The Summer Borders
Nymans: Sub tropical borders
Patio Garden Plants
Paths - Brick paving
Plant names
Plants for Autumn
Plants for free
Preparing a seed bed
Poinsettia care
Poisonous plants
Potagers
Pumpkin carving
Pumpkin carving for Halloween
Pumpkins
Ragwort
Record breaking fruit and vegetables
Rose pest and diseases
Shade loving fruit and nuts
Soil structure
The anatomy of vegetables
The worlds largest vegetable
Watering plants
What is an artichoke?
What is a tree?
What is mistletoe?
What is a broccoflower?
What is the difference between a banana and a plantain?
What is a loofah?
What is a mushroom?
What is a potager?
What is a sea cucumber?
What is a vegetable?
What is the difference between a bee and a wasp?
What is the difference between a currant, raisin and a sultana?
What is the difference between a marrow and a courgette?
What is the difference between a rambling and climbing rose?
What is the difference between a peach and a nectarine?
What is the difference between a rhododendron and an azalea?
What is the difference between a conifer and a deciduous tree? What is the difference between a squash, pumpkin and a gourd?
What is the difference between a turnip and a swede?
What is the difference between a yam and a sweet potato?
What is the difference between a vegetable and a fruit?
What is the difference between a geranium and a pelagonium?
What is the difference between a cactus and a succulent?
What is frankincense?
What is Myrhh?
What is green manure?
When to plant potatoes
Which plant has the largest seed?
Which plant has the largest leaves?
Which plant has the largest flower?
Why do we kiss under the mistletoe?
Thinning and transplanting
Tree size
Vegetable crop rotation
Weeding
Why don't seedless grapes have seeds?
Worm facts
Using pedestrian mowers

Environment

Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

All about starfish
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Archaeopteryx
Ant facts
Bee facts
Butterfly facts
Can starfish grow back their arms?
Causes of acid rain
Conserving fossil fuels
Cuttlefish facts
Earthworms
Energy saving light bulbs
Famous fossils
Fossils: Venericardia
Fossils: Turritella
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy
Fossil hunting at Bracklesham Bay
How far is the moon?
How many seas are there in the world?
How big is a giant earthworm?
Is the sea sponge a plant or an animal?
Ladybirds
Ladybird facts
Keystone species
Moth Facts
Sea animals: Sea Anemones
Sea cucumber facts
Sea cucumber facts
Seahorse facts
Starfish facts
Star Starfish
The house spider
The false widow spider
The seahorse
The sea cucumber
What is a sea sponge?
What is a solar eclipse?
What is a cuttlefish?
What is a ladybug?
What is a sea anemone?
What is a starfish?
What is acid rain?
What is global warming?
What is light pollution?
Why is the Dead Sea so salty?
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the difference between a butterfly and  a moth?
What is the difference between an insect and a spider?
What is the difference between an asteroid and a comet?
What is the difference between energy efficient light bulbs and traditional light bulbs?
What is the difference between a fog and a mist?
What is the difference between hard and soft woods?
What is the difference between neon and fluorescent light?
What is the difference between the sea and the ocean?
What is the difference between hibernation and sleep?
What is the difference between a wasp and a hornet?
What is the difference between a snake and a serpent?
What is the difference between a wallaby and a kangaroo?
What is the difference between a particle and an atom?
What is the difference between a parrot and a macaw?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?
What is the Gulf Stream?
What is lightning?
Why are polar bears white?

RECIPES

Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

Artichokes Alla Romana
Banana loaf recipes
Beef stroganoff
Birthday cake recipe
Black Forest cake
Brussels sprouts
Butternut squash with leek and stilton
Carrot cake recipe
Cherry pie
Cheese and ham pancakes
Chicken fried rice
Chicken stir fry
Chicken supreme
Chicken risotto recipe
Chocolate Cheesecake
Christmas cake
Christmas mince pies
Christmas puddings
Christmas recipes - mashed swede and carrots
Christmas recipes - Red cabbage with apple
Coffee and walnut cake
Dauphinoise potatoes
Feta and nut stuffed peppers
GI Diet - Carrot and pineapple cake
GI Diet - Falafal
GI Diet - Fruit and vegetables
GI Diet - Dairy foods
GI Diet - Food and Diet
GI Diet - Low GI Foods
GI Diet - Porridge with berries
GI Diet - Vegetable pizza
GI Diet - Smoked salmon and cottage cheese sandwich
Ginger Bread House
Gingerbread Christmas Decorations
How to cook artichokes
How to make Christmas cake
How to make Christmas mince meat
How to grow broccoli from seed
How to grow cauliflower from seed
How to grow garlic
How to make Harvey Wallbanger cocktails
How to make pina colada cocktails
How to make Tequila sunrise cocktails
How to make bread
How to make pancakes
How to make pastry
How do you know when tomatoes are ripe?
How to roast pork
How to roast turkey
Lemon meringue pie
Loaf cakes
Low GI foods
Macaroni cheese
Pumpkins
Pumpkin Bread
Pumpkin cupcakes
Pumpkin cheesecake recipe
Pumpkin Risotto recipe
Raspberry and coconut loaf
Raspberry pie
Recipe for Asparagus Quiche
Recipe for blackcurrant cheesecake
Recipe for cauliflower cheese
Recipe for Chocolate Cheesecake
Recipe for chicken fajitas
Recipe for Christmas pudding
Recipe for Egg Custard
Recipe for English Apple pie
Recipe for fairy cakes
Recipe for home made olive bread
Recipe for Italian pizza
Recipe for Italian tomato sauce
Recipe for lasagna
Recipe for Quiche Lorraine
Recipe for pancakes
Recipe for pea salad with mint
Recipe for Plum Chutney
Recipe for pumpkin pie
Recipe for pumpkin puree
Recipe for rhubarb crumble
Recipe for Salmon with lemon and herbs
Recipe Spaghetti bolognese
Recipe for shortbread
Recipe for spinach and broccoli fritatta
Recipe for strawberry cheesecake
Recipe for strawberry jam
Recipe for Tiramisu
Recipe for tomato soup
Recipe for victoria sponge
Salt
Strudel recipe
Sponge cake recipe
Spiced brussels sprouts
Spicy meatballs in tomato sauce
Sultana Scones
Superfoods
Sun dried tomato and herb bread
Valentines Cake
Vegetarian recipes - vegetable fried rice
What is a vegetable?
What is a food allergy?
What is a food intolerance?
What is the difference between a food intolerance and a food allergy?
What is the difference between a soup and a broth?
What is the difference between a currant, raisin and a sultana?
What is the difference between a marrow and a courgette?
What is the difference between a stew and a casserole?
What is the difference between butter and margarine?
What is the difference between a peach and a nectarine?
What is the difference between a squash, pumpkin and a gourd?
What is the difference between a yam and a sweet potato?
What is the difference between a vegetable and a fruit?
What is the difference between gammon, ham and bacon?
What is the difference between a zebra and a horse?
5 A DAY PORTIONS

CONTACT

So you want to contact SeedtoFeedMe?

Name *

Email *

Subject *

Message *

Powered byEMF Web Forms Builder
Report Abuse

Tuesday, 17 July 2012

CONSERVING FOSSIL FUELS



Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

In countless ways coal, oil and gas provide power for our daily life.  But we must cut our use of them, and look for other energy sources, before the costs to the environment become too high.


No single source of energy can immediately replace fossil fuels.  Most alternatives produce too little power and cause some pollution, although none is as dirty as coal, oil and gas, which contribute to acid rain and the greenhouse gases.  Nuclear power has its own problems, including leakage prevention, waste disposal and the dismantling of redundant reactors.

Alternative power sources will help to some extent. But without fossil fuels or nuclear energy our standard of living could drop to that of centuries ago, dependant on horses and oxen for transport and food production.


Rather than abandon all use of fossil fuels, we need to adopt a policy of efficiency.
Energy efficiency basically means using less fuel, but making it work harder.  The key is to design more efficient end-use equipment.  A modern gas stove heats a pint of water with proportionally less energy than an open wood fire.  

Nations must invest in energy efficient equipment, which will reduce the demand for fossil fuels.  They must also research the use of renewable energy sources on a massive scale.  Only in this way can we reduce damage to the environment.  Global investment in the two areas of energy efficiency and renewable sources will also help with narrow the immense gulf between rich and poor nations.


We can all contribute to energy conservation by preserving heat in our homes and other buildings.  This means instillating roof, wall, window and floor installation.  We should use fewer and less fuel hungry cars, use them less often and share rides.  Much oil is made into plastic so buying products with less packaging will help.

For related articles click onto:
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Caring for the coral reefs 
Causes of acid rain

Coral reefs and the greenhouse effect
Conserving fossil fuels
Energy saving light bulbs
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy

Keystone species
What is acid rain?
What is the difference between an asteroid and a comet?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?

What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the difference between energy efficient light bulbs and traditional light bulbs?
What is the difference between neon and fluorescent light?

Friday, 13 July 2012

FOSSIL FUELS: ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF ENERGY


Click here for the 'Seeds of Eaden' seed shop

Nuclear power
Energy is released by splitting the nuclei of uranium alone; a process called nuclear fission.
This method could probably produce enough energy for our needs for several thousand years.  There is, however, increasing concern over the possible safety risks, particularly after the 1986 disaster in Chernobyl, USSR and the tsunami hit Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan which both sent radiation around the world.

The sea
One way to use tidal energy would be the dam an estuary.  The rising tide fills a reservoir from where water falls through turbines to produce electricity.  This method could meet 0.5 percent of the worlds energy needs.  

Geothermal energy
The heat energy in the Earths core is released as volcanoes, geysers and hot springs.  The latter provide heating for the city of  Reykjavik, Iceland. Use of this energy source has been increasing at more than 15 percent each year.  To make any great use of geothermal energy, however, it will be necessary to dig deep for it.  In Cornwall, an experimental powers station will shortly be dug, with two wells each 6km deep.  Cold water will be pumped in, heated by the hot rocks at that depth, and pumped out again, where the heat will be used to generate electricity.

Solar power
The sun has an almost endless supply of energy.  Plants trap it in photosynthesis to make carbohydrates; we can convert light into energy.
Solar energy may be used directly; in the Californian Mojave Desert solar panels produce power for 2000 homes.  Even in Britain we can use solar panels in houses to reduce our need for fossil fuels.  Solar power is probably only of use on a large scale in very sunny countries.

Biomass
We can use other fuels than coal, including waste, dung, special crops and wood.  These are collectively referred to as biomass.  Some cities burn household waste in incinerators.  In Coventry the heat is used by the Peugeot factory but in most other cities this heat is wasted.  Heat could be harvested from the cooling towers of power stations. Brazil grows sugar cane and other crops to produce alcohol (ethanol) to fuel cars.  In china waste and sewage are converted to bio gas which is used to light and heat homes in villages.

Wind Power
Wind turbines could provide 20 percent of our energy needs.  Wind energy is endlessly renewable and does not cause pollution, but can be noisy and do require a large amount of space.  
Wind turbines already provide an important source of power and can be positioned either on land or off shore in the sea.  California has created great windmill farms in the desert.  Each wind turbine has sails with a diameter of 20 metres, and generates a significant proportion of energy from the wind.

Wood
Burnt to produce heat or light, wood is the main energy source for some 70 percent of people in developing countries.  The UK could grow enough wood to heat 700,000 homes - not nearly enough for today's population.
In many areas wood is being burnt faster than it can be replanted.  Greenbelts help to slow this reduction of woodland but wood cannot be considered a renewable source of energy.

Hydro-electric power
The power of water flowing down through a river or dam can be harnessed to generate electricity.  Scotland, Scandinavia and many African countries already produce much of their power in this way.
There are drawbacks to hydro-electric power, not least the high initial costing of damming a suitable river.  Agricultural land and homes may be flooded.  Furthermore, the soil washed into the dammed lake makes it increasingly shallow, limiting the dam to a maximum 40 years effective use. This problem is particularly common in tropical countries.


For related articles click onto:
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Caring for the coral reefs 
Causes of acid rain

Coral reefs and the greenhouse effect
Conserving fossil fuels
Energy saving light bulbs
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy

Keystone species
What is acid rain?
What is the difference between an asteroid and a comet?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?

What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the difference between a rock and a stone?
What is the difference between energy efficient light bulbs and traditional light bulbs?
What is the difference between neon and fluorescent light?

Wednesday, 11 July 2012

FOSSIL FUELS



Four fifths of the worlds energy consumption relies on non-renewable fossil fuels such as coal, oil and natural gas.  At the present rate of use, gas supplies should last for over 200 years and coal for some 3000 years.  Before these run out, however, pollution from their use may devastate our environment unless we change our ways. 

For thousands of years people have heated and illuminated their homes with fire.  Some burn coal while others, particularly in the developing countries, burn wood, peat and animal dung.  All these fuels provide heat, but wood can be replaced by growing mature trees, whilst coal cannot be manufactured.

Coal, produced by the effect of pressure and heat on swamp trees over a period of many years is an example of a fossil fuel.  Oil and gas are also fossil fuels.  Oil was formed from small plants and animals which died in the ancient seas.  they were buried by what would become rock; as with coal, pressure, heat and time have slowly turned their bodies into oil and gas.

In the late 1970s and early 80's the overriding fear was that our existing coal and oil stocks would run out, particularly with a world population doubling every 20 years, and increasing demand from the less developed countries. 

Today the threat is perceived differently.  Many scientists fear that the pollution from coal, oil and gas will increase the effects of acid rain, global warming and depletion of the ozone layer.  If these polluting processes continue they will cause irreparable damage to the planet, long before we run out of energy.


For related articles click onto:
Acid rain and its effect on wildlife
Caring for the coral reefs
Causes of acid rain
Coral reefs and the greenhouse effect
Conserving fossil fuels
Energy saving light bulbs
Fossil Fuels
Fossil fuels: Alternative sources of energy
Keystone species
What is acid rain?
What is fracking?
What is global warming?
What is the greenhouse effect?
What is the difference between energy efficient light bulbs and traditional light bulbs?
What is the difference between neon and fluorescent light?